Tag Archives: Dietary fiber

Are Carbs The Enemy?

Of all the major nutrients, carbohydrates have gotten a pretty bad rap. Personally, I don’t think it’s justified.

Carbohydrates are the core energy source for our body and brain and can be converted into amino acids to serve as the building blocks for protein. Certain sources of carbs are also chock-full of nutritious vitamins, minerals and fiber.

Grains, milk, beans, fruit and starchy vegetables, like potatoes and corn, all contribute to our daily carbohydrate intake. In fact, the U.S. government suggests we consume 45-65% of our daily calories from this nutrient group. So why the notoriety?

Not all carbs are created equal. There’s a big difference (nutritionally-speaking) between “refined” and “complex” carbohydrates. Refined carbs include chips, cake, candy, cereal, sweetened beverages (e.g., juice, lemonade, soda) and bread and pasta made with white flour. These foods are literally stripped of nutrients during processing. Due to their lack of fiber, they don’t fill us up and are digested quickly, causing our blood sugar to spike. Refined carbs contain few vitamins and minerals and likely end up replacing healthier foods in our diet. Eating too many of these foods can also lead to high triglyceride levels.

On the other hand, many complex carbohydrates are packed with nutrients. Examples include brown and wild rice, whole wheat pasta and bread, oatmeal, quinoa, bulgur and barley. Such whole grains are naturally low in fat and added sugars and supply iron, folate, zinc, magnesium, B-vitamins and fiber – a nutritional powerhouse. Fiber cannot be digested by the human body and therefore, this complex carb passes through our system without adding calories! Fiber can help lower cholesterol, regulate bowel function, reduce spikes in blood sugar, protect against colon cancer and help us lose weight by warding off hunger! The fiber in whole fruit is what makes it a much better choice than juice, which is high in sugar and calories and not a dieter’s friend.

When it comes to weight loss, the low-carb Atkins diet certainly gets a lot of press. However, weight loss occurs when you consume fewer total calories than your body needs, whether you’re cutting back on fat, protein or carbs. A sustainable strategy for weight loss should reduce calories from all nutrient groups, so that you do not feel deprived. Reduce your intake of sugary beverages, desserts and foods made with refined flour, like white bread and pasta and be sure to include nutrient-dense and fiber-packed sources of complex carbs in your meal plan!

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Filed under Dairy, Food Groups, Fruits and Vegetables, Grains, Heart Healthy Choices, Weight loss

Benefits of Fiber

Q: What exactly is ‘fiber’ and why is it so good for you?

A: Fiber is an indigestible carbohydrate, or a string of sugar units held together by bonds that human digestive enzymes cannot break. There are two types: soluble and insoluble fiber.

Food Sources

Soluble fiber: barley, oats, oat bran, rye, fruits (especially apples and citrus), beans, vegetables, seeds

Insoluble fiber: Brown rice, fruits, beans, seeds, vegetables (cabbage, carrots, brussels sprouts), wheat bran, whole grains

While fiber does not provide energy, it has many other beneficial effects:

1. Lowers blood cholesterol: Soluble fiber reduces cholesterol and the risk of heart disease by several mechanisms. (Note: This is why General Mills is able to claim that eating whole grain oat Cheerios can help lower your cholesterol.)

2. Maintains bowel function: Insoluble fiber speeds up the transit of food through your system, while soluble fiber slows it down.

3. Assists blood glucose control: Soluble fiber slows the absorption of glucose from the intestine into the blood stream, thereby preventing a spike (and crash) in blood glucose after a meal. This can lower the risk of type 2 diabetes.

4. Promotes weight management: Fiber makes you feel full and lessens hunger

5. May defend against colon and rectal cancer: Scientific studies are mixed, but insoluble fiber speeds up the removal of cancer-causing agents from the colon, while resident bacteria in the colon ferment soluble fiber, producing a beneficial compound that may help colon cells resist injury.

Recommended Intake: Since most fiber-rich foods supply a mixture of soluble and insoluble fiber, recommendations are given without regard to type. The American Dietetic Association suggests 20 – 35 grams of fiber daily, which is about twice the average intake. That said, don’t overload on fiber and make sure to increase fluid consumption as you gradually increase fiber intake.

Fruits, vegetables, whole grains and beans are among the best sources of fiber! Also, remember that fiber supplements are not necessarily substitutes for whole, fiber-rich foods.

Check the nutrition facts on the back of products to find out how much fiber is in one serving! Here are some examples:

½ cup whole grain barley – 3g fiber

½ cup instant oatmeal – 2g fiber

1 slice whole wheat bread – 3g fiber

1 slice white bread – 1g fiber

½ cup cooked brown rice – 2g fiber

½ cup cooked white rice – less than 1g fiber

¾ cup (2 oz) whole wheat penne pasta, dry – 6g fiber

¾ cup (2 oz) regular penne pasta, dry – 2g fiber


1 medium apple (with skin) – 3g fiber

1 medium pear (with skin) – 5g fiber

½ cup blackberries – 4g fiber

½ cup strawberries – 2g fiber

1 medium orange – 4g fiber

½ cup orange juice – less than 1g fiber

½ cup American grapes – less than 1g fiber


½ cup lentils – 8g fiber

½ cup chickpeas (garbanzo beans) – 5g fiber

½ cup black beans – 7.5g fiber


½ cup cooked broccoli – 2.5g fiber

1 medium artichoke – 10g fiber

1 medium baked potato (with skin) – 4.5g fiber

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Filed under Fruits and Vegetables, Grains, Heart Healthy Choices, Medical Conditions, Weight loss